Is The Hustle Worth It?

the

Nicole Walters Podcast

The Nicole Walters Podcast

Join me each week for a new episode packed with what you need to know to gain clarity, grow your network, and monetize your life using the proven corporate strategies I’ve mastered in 10 years as a Fortune 500 executive.

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SHOW NOTES

Y’all we get to talk relationships, hustle culture, and what it’s been like growing up as a content creator with Kenzie Elizabeth of the ILYSM podcast. As self-professed workaholics, we answer the question of, is the hustle worth it?

Kenzie is out here doing so many amazing things and in this chat she shares how she got started and what she’s learned along the way.

Thanks for being here today friend! Find Kenzie’s new brand at TheOhKind.com and listen to her podcast, I Love You So Much, anywhere you love to listen!

Head over to Instagram to let us know you listened @NicoleWalters and @KenzieElizabeth.

 

Nicole:

Hey, everyone, I am so excited because we are doing a chat and you know how I am, I don’t just bring anyone on. I don’t just talk to anyone. And I’m so excited because her podcast is dynamic. It is funny. It is interesting. And it’s a podcast that I actually give to my girls to listen to. Because I’m like, I want you to hear what it sounds like to one, build something incredible. Stay true to you, keep showing up. But also learn as you go. And that’s why I have Kenzie Elizabeth here from the I love you so much podcast. And she’s here today to talk to us about all amazing things with building a business yourself. You know, she’s 25. And she’s done so much already. And also trying to balance that with like life and family and goals and perspectives and dating. And I know that I’ve got, you know, lots of youngins in my 20s who are listening. And I also have several of us who are trying to literally do a lot of what Kenzie is already doing. So I’m thrilled that she’s here. Kenzie, thank you so much for coming on the podcast.

Kenzie:

Thanks for having me. That was so nice. All I heard was that you thought I was funny and I love it here!

Nicole:

No, it’s true. Because it takes a lot to be a great interviewer. You know, there’s so many people who do podcasts and you’re just kind of like, that was kind of dry, you know? Or like ever, the conversation wasn’t as dynamic and you do such a good job kind of keeping it exciting and fun and like bringing out the best in people you chat with. So thank you.

Kenzie:

Yeah, I came out of the womb like I didn’t shut up. I was just talking. You know what I mean? So I think it was like a very natural endeavor.

Nicole:

Sure, sure. And it’s funny because I think that growing up, it’s always like God, she just talks all the time and like, will go look at us now. Right? You don’t get us now.

Kenzie:

Actually weird. I say that. And then I was actually held back in preschool because I was shy. Anyone I tell that to..

Nicole:

Nobody believes you?

Kenzie:

No. And then I was quickly voted social butterfly in the school. Like it core there was some shift. But I was actually shy when I was younger, which is I’m the least I’m the most open person. Shy, very outgoing and loud. You know?

Nicole:

Maybe you were just taking it in. You were just like, okay, where exactly am I going to shine?

Kenzie:

I was busy reading books, and I didn’t have any interest in the little kid.

Nicole:

Not everybody gets it.

Kenzie:

It was just me and Junie B Jones.

Nicole:

So hey, just as a quick intro, right, so I mean, you literally are doing all the things on social so you’re on YouTube, you’re on Instagram, you obviously have your incredible podcast. So tell us a little bit more about that. Why did you start YouTube really because that was kind of like your your first starting off point.

Kenzie:

So I started YouTube when I was 16. In middle school, I was going through just a hard time I have a great family. I love them a lot. But…

Nicole:

It’s a big family though. Huge family, personalities.

Kenzie:

Lots of personalities, divorce, remarried, like just it was very tumultuous. I grew up in a very, like emotionally explosive household. And so I started watching YouTube as it was a kind of like my safe place.

Nicole:

Yeah, it was an outlet.

Kenzie:

And I really liked YouTube. And I was like, Man, I would like love to start a channel start in like seventh grade or, and I did it because I was like, what people will think I’m weird. And then I woke up and I’m like, I’ve never once cared about people think like, what am I it was just weird. I was like, why am I doing whatever. So I started a channel when I was 16. People actually nice to me about it, too. So that was plus.Nicole:

Which is a super plus also, being that age like people can be crazy.

Kenzie:

I had so many friends at that time who ended up being homeschooled. Because like who lived in different states. They had bad experience. Yeah. But again, I think it comes to the fact that I didn’t shut up and I had I was always a floater. So I had a friend and every friend group. Sure. So like I don’t think people could have been mean to me, because like I was friends with one of their friends.

Nicole:

Oh, you know, of course.

Kenzie:

So I really spread myself thing.

Nicole:

That says a lot about your personality, too. It’s just kind of like I’m open minded. I’m like trying to meet people like I care, you know, and I think that all of that’s really reflected in your youtube content. Because here’s where I think it’s so different. So, I mean, there are lots of influencers out there. There are lots of people who are creating content every day, but your content always is about giving. There’s a lesson, there’s feedback, there’s something about how they’re going to love this for their life or if they’re running to this issue, or, Hey, this may be what I’m doing every day. But this is what I’ve kind of learned within that. Tell me a little bit about that. Was that organic for you? Or? I mean, because not everyone’s like that people think it’s just like showing off their life. You know what I mean?

Kenzie:

No, I think it was organic, because you saying that I wouldn’t even describe my content that way. Like, I wouldn’t be like, I think especially the podcast, the one thing about me is that I really do care about being authentic. And if I’m going through something, it’s very hard for me to show up online and if I’m not able to talk about it, then I feel like I’m being fake. But also, I’m just being like, emotionally healthy and mature.

Nicole:

You know, for anyone listening, you’re entitled to keep stuff to yourself, you don’t get asked to share it, you know, at least not until you have a clarity around it. You know what I mean? It’s not for you real time.

Kenzie:

Yeah, my friend Lauren, I don’t. I’m gonna butcher this, but always says, like, I’m not going to share until it’s something along the lines of like, it’s going to give someone value I don’t. In the meantime, it’s not helping me or helping them, you know. So, with that being said, I typically talk about things either during or after, and I, I’ve, so much of my audience has grown up with me. So that’s been really helpful. And I get so many DMs and messages and like feedback on the podcast, or just comments or questions, or girls be like, I’m going through this. So I kind of know what my audience needs and wants so it’s really helpful. It’s almost like free market research.

Nicole:

And maybe that’s why you don’t realize it because all your content is kind of painted from our perspective of I know who’s watching this. And so let me tell and show them what I know. They may be wondering in their mind as they’re watching, so maybe that’s why you don’t realize like, because you’re not like ending everyone like Mr. Rogers style. And today’s lesson is such a such a it’s not like that, but it’s very like, oh, my gosh, you probably want to know that this has pockets, you probably want to know, because this has this or, you know, when I was going through this, I felt like this, but this is what I found, you know, and I think that that is honestly, it’s like how people are learning now you know what I mean? Like, I think that there’s, it’s so easy to be like, oh, yeah, I just follow these motivational things. But how did it feel so good to see someone going through it? It’s like, so brave of you.

Kenzie:

I really think you I really feel like everyone is like my friend. I meet girls out and about all the time. And I would be friends with all of them. Right? So a lot of is like I think about the conversations I’m having in my own relationships, too. I bring a lot of my like friends who are providing a more traditional career background, aka they’re like normal and not influencers or like sharing every moment.

Nicole:

They have days off

Kenzie:

I’m the weird one right now. Right? And so that’s like really helpful.

Nicole:

Well, let’s talk about what that dynamic is like, in your family and with your friends. So obviously, we both have unconventional jobs. But they’re definitely jobs, right. And at some point in time it went from I’m 16 and this is an outlet, and I’m sharing to oh, you know, not just like making money. But this is I’m not going to follow a conventional path because I’ve already found the thing I’m doing right now. So how did your friends respond to that? And how did your family respond to that?

Kenzie:

My dad like thinks I could run for president. Oh, my dad immediately and he’s also like a businessman. He reminds me a lot of Ed Mylett like they’re very similar.

Nicole:

Okay, so he gets it so he gets like literally twice so excited because like he knows you’ve got the Mojo. This is like the thing.

Kenzie:

And my mom also growing up owned like a bedding and draperies company. It was like at one point in your blog. I did that for a couple of years. Like she was also a stay at home mom. And then she also worked in real estate. Like, she did a bunch of different things. My dad is definitely the one who my mom was, my mom was able to naturally enjoy life a lot more. I think that like my dad and I.

Nicole:

You guys are workers. Yeah, yeah. Right. Right. So she’s like, I do things to support my life.

Kenzie:

Yes, exactly. She has, I think, a healthier relationship with it. But I don’t know, I don’t think they ever I don’t know if they ever expected me to follow a normal career path. It was just kind of a thing. Like when I started YouTube, it was at a time where I thought I was gonna make $5 if I made any money at all, I will still be doing everything that I do for free because I love it so much.

Nicole:

But that’s how it works.

Kenzie:

That’s how it works. But I also had some sort of vision for like, this is going to be something even though it wasn’t ever a thing. But really back then there were people like way bigger at the time, but there were you just didn’t know people only recently realized they didn’t know it.

Nicole:

And also people were so there was so much mystery around how do you actually make this an income? And I remember that it was literally like because I mean, both of us I got on at the same time as you like I’ve been doing this for about 12-15ish years. But I obviously was older than you but same sort of thing where it was like people just didn’t understand how you’re making your money. They were like, Oh, well we know we need to create content we know it needs to be consistent. We know people need to like it. We don’t really know how that translates to dollars outside of like agencies and like people but now it’s like make your own products like partnerships, collaborate, like there’s all these things you know, so I love that you still have that intention in your mind. I think for anyone listening like understand that you’ve heard me say time and time again, whatever you’re starting in this you know season of your life intentionality is going to be critical if you’re not doing things with some degree of I would like this outcome, you’re not going to get the results you want. So let’s talk a little bit about that healthy balance, because it’s something I talk about too, is I’m a workaholic. And I don’t say that with pride, you know, because it’s something I’m trying to reform, you know, how are you seeing that manifests? Because, you know, let’s just dispel the rumor, being an influencer doesn’t mean I just sit at home and take pictures of my food. Yeah. So what’s that looking like for you?

Kenzie:

So I’ve struggled a lot with hustle culture. And I’ve talked about this a lot on my own show. So anyone who’s listening for me, I’m sorry, like, it’s like my go to thing.

Nicole:

But it’s important to me, like important. People don’t understand, like, I’m talking about it at 38. You’re talking about it at 25. This is a problem. You know, they mean, like, it should not be that I’m still saying the same energy years later. You know what I mean? So, so Yeah, talk about how is it manifesting in your life?

Kenzie:

So I would say when I was when I was like, 17, I moved to LA when I was 17. My channel was doing well, I was making enough, but I wasn’t making good money. And I mean, for 17 year old Yes. But I wasn’t like balling by any means, you know?

Nicole:

People here influencer and they think ferraris, and, you know, so like, living in the hills, like, it’s not all that.

Kenzie:

Yeah this was pre pre pre pre even vine days. Well, maybe vine was the thing, but tick tock wasn’t a thing. Right? Right. Very, very, very different

Nicole:

Like minimal ways to make money.

Kenzie:

Yeah and you have to like, really, really, really try to gain a following. It’s just a very different world. So I struggle with hustle culture, growing up more so it was never, I think I had a hard time differentiating, like, who I am versus what I do. And the fact that like, I am my own person, and I also do this and like not getting those confused and so my hustle culture where that came in. It wasn’t ever like, I think I found a lot of identity and work. But weirdly, it wasn’t ever the number of followers literally ever. It was never like my popularity on the internet. It was by how hard I was working.

Nicole:

Like in my how many hours you were putting?

Kenzie:

Yes. Which it wasn’t even like working smart. It was. I would guilt I was actually I was, I still struggle with this. I was in the car with a friend this morning at 8am talking about this with her because she’s the same way. And I’m like, I’ve only like recently getting to the point where I’m allowing myself to work less hours and realizing like, you can’t hold on so tightly to everything. And like, actually, there is such a thing as like, if you’re working something to death, like it’s not helpful for the business.

Nicole:

So when you say work less hours, you’d be like, Oh my gosh, I haven’t edited like 15 videos. So I haven’t done anything today. But like realistically, like, you probably wouldn’t even because we all have forever to do list. You know what I mean? Like, if we’re lucky enough to knock off 10 things, 10 more things are gonna take its place. So it’s like because if you are an entrepreneur, or a mom, or somebody who just has that type of life, where you’re a go getter, you’re always going to have more stuff on your list, like an empty To Do List honestly would be like a nightmare to me. So knowing that, is that what you mean? Like it was just sort of I wasn’t measuring it in completion or success. I was measuring it in just honestly, like how often I was on the grind versus enjoying my success.

Kenzie:

Yes, definitely.

Nicole:

Wow and how’d you like start noticing that? Were you like getting sick? Were you missing fun things with friends? What was happening?

Kenzie:

So I definitely would say I didn’t even have a social life for years, because I was so I mean, I did, but not the life that I would want. It wasn’t a priority at all.

Nicole:

Were you thinking about it in relation to work?

Kenzie:

I just need to work I need to do this, or and it depends on like, whatever. I’ve lived like 15 different life phases since 3725. Or so it really just depends on the time period of my life. But like, I also just had different priorities at different times. And it did. It was helpful in certain ways. But I’ve had anxiety my entire life. So it’s like my anxiety would get really bad.

Nicole:

And then the solution was more work?

Kenzie:

Yes. Which at the same time, that increased the anxiety. Yes. It was a never ending cycle.

Nicole:

Yes, No, I totally get it. It’s funny because I have struggled with the same thing. And it’s defining this validation, like, Oh, this is my thing. This is my identity, this is what I do. And this is my value to others. So like, I got married at 22. And so I was like, already, you know, so young, but feeling like this is how people see me and how I’m best helpful to them. So I need to work because if not, I’m not like honoring that relationship. And I’m not showing up the way I need to show up. And it wasn’t until I think I came to some of the realizations that you’re, you know, coming to but also like practicing, you know, where I was like, I’m tired, you know what I mean? Like, what is the point of the work and the money if I’m not living, you know, and then also relationships. So like, you come from a really big family and you know, texting culture is very, like family oriented, very social, all of that. I mean, what was like missing out on some of those things in exchange to create content, you know, I mean, it’s a hard thing to explain.

Kenzie:

So when I moved I also had a lot of family things going on. So I actually think missing out on family things and having space was incredibly helpful.

Nicole:

Do you feel like you could finally shape your own identity, I mean, because also being in a really big family, sometimes you can feel like you get lost in the mix. So what was the most beneficial thing you think then for that separation?

Kenzie:

So I’m the oldest child, so I never had I lost my identity. I noticed, like my biological siblings, for sure. So I don’t feel like I lost my identity, it was more so I needed to get away to like, heal and be on my own. And now I’m able to where it really did, I would say, as far as missing out on my niece’s seven starting at like, really soon, maybe I’m very, very close with her and and I’m very involved in her life. And so as she was getting older, I would always fly in for the birthdays and fly in for stuff. But as she was getting old enough to realize that I was flying in and not just like in town that started to make me even I think about like, I just I literally will not move because I will not not be in her life. Like I’ve just so and so involved in her life. So amazing. So I see it now more so but at the time, it was helpful. What I will say about friends is that I was definitely a lot less engaged. And like I the thing, that my favorite thing about myself.

Nicole:

Were you the silent one in the group chat like I’m in there, I’m reading everything, but I’m never responding. And I’m not really like, involved?

Kenzie:

Yes. And it’s weird, because I’m also always the planner and the coordinator. I think people also my friends just like had an understanding, like she’s just busy. Like we also they were going to college. So that was helpful. So we all had our online or, but even my friends in LA, I remember getting to the point where like, you know, when people are talking and just conversations, like, What’s one word that you would describe each other with, and everyone would always talk about, the first thing that would come to mind would be like, driven, work ethic, hard worker, and I was like, that is not the first thing I want my friends to describe me as.

Nicole:

Yes. I’m like graceful, kind, generous, you know…

Kenzie:

A good friend!

Nicole:

Like these more personality traits. And what’s crazy is we’re doing the things that they end up saying are the definition of who we are, thinking that it makes us look the other way without realizing like no, the person who they see as being like graceful and a good friend is the person that’s actually present. Yeah, but you know, I’m not always present because I’m working. So no, so smart. So let’s talk about what that means in your personal life then, with your goals, like are you dating, are you able to date like, I mean, so many of us, I think, like I said, I was married by 22. We spend our early years feeling like, Oh, we got to hit these marks, you know, like, gotta get married, gotta get a place. Gotta get pregnant, gotta whatever, like that was the traditional perspective. But you’ve kind of taken a different approach. So tell me a little bit more of that, because you talk about a lot on the podcast.

Kenzie:

Yeah, I was up until about a year and a half ago, two years ago, I was pretty much always dating like I was either. I had like long term boyfriends or there was like someone around or I think also a lot of the relationship because I was so busy at that time. Like my, I think what my college relationship, a lot of it was just convenience, because I was always working and there was someone who just like, sit next to me while I was working.

Nicole:

Sure. Just companionship.

Kenzie:

Exactly. So I was always dating. And then I will say like, it is difficult. It’s a little bit of like an interesting experience to date when you are like a younger woman who’s making money, who’s successful, who’s definitely making more money than them.

Nicole:

Still an interesting experience when you get older, girl.

Kenzie:

I was like, I feel like it’s always gonna be that way.

Nicole:

It is, like one of the things my therapist told me was like, Look, you need to accept right now that you’ll likely always be the breadwinner. So you need to like figure out and set your boundaries around that now, because that’s what it’s going to be.

So like, what does that mean, in the future? So and it’s kind of a weird thing to acknowledge, like, Well, no, like, I still want to be like, okay, for it, I still want to, like have some of these, like, at least for me, these traditional roles, you know, in a perspective, but I learned very quickly that you can still have all of that, you know, because money is just like a tool to help you get things it doesn’t have to be the main thing in the room. You know what I mean? Yeah, but yeah, so like for you, you’re always kind of dating, but you were having people? Have you felt like you’ve been able to have meaningful relationships while being a workaholic? Or, you know, or have you had to reform one to kind of get the other what does it look like?

Kenzie:

Yes, but I think I lost out on friendships at the time, because like something had to get but it wasn’t even that I lost out on friendships. I just actually didn’t really have the friendships that I wanted my, some of them is that yeah, like, I had my like two best riding dogs from college. And I always had that with but like, and I’m talking about my life in LA, I think I started like dating someone. And we were together for a while and I lost someone, I lost things because like, I just didn’t have the friendships, the depth that I wanted.

Nicole:

And you didn’t have the capacity, right, like, and even nurture thing. So I think that’s something we also like, kind of, I don’t know, we minimize that. It’s not just about maintaining those friendships. It’s also like the capacity to nurture the ones like I’ve gotten new friends coming in and out of my life now that I’m like, oh my god, I’d really love to like explore this, but just the season I’m in right now. Like, there’s only so much I have to give and what’s great is for some of those friendships, they are more than willing to adapt. You know what I mean? They’re like we understand but then if they’re not, it’s like I don’t have anything left to give. So it just is what it is. Do you look back and have any regrets about that?

Kenzie:

I do in the sense of I was nurturing the wrong friendships.

Nicole:

Oh, tell me more about that.

Kenzie:

So like my two three best friends from college. That was never One issue that was our problem, we get it, they get Asian. Yeah, yeah. And it was fine. I just, I didn’t I had friendships that I thought I really loved. And I thought were really good. And as time has gone on, maybe it wasn’t the right fit. I think I was in a friendship more specifically where like…

Nicole:

Right now you’re talking about something really specific comes to mind.

Kenzie:

Nothing I did was ever okay. And this was this was this person with every friend that they’d ever had. And they told me all these stories and you know me the idiot thinking like well it’s not going to be me.

Nicole:

Yeah and you’re generous, open minded, obviously.

Kenzie:

Like when it’s the same thing in dating, and when you see all the red flags, but you just keep going. And I really, really loved this friend. And this friend was so fun. And we had so much…

Nicole:

When it was good it was really good, but when I was really bad, really bad.

Kenzie:

Yeah. And so I felt, even for a couple of like a year or two after I was still putting in the effort. And it was like weird. And finally, just more stuff happened. I’m like, I just can’t do this anymore. Like nothing I ever do will be enough.

Nicole:

Did you do a formal friend breakup?

Kenzie:

No, because…

Nicole:

Or did you just let it fall off?

Kenzie:

So it had fallen off already. And then we’d go back and then a fallen off. And I would if you like try to have calm or it was more of a friendship where like, if you try to have a conversation, they’d be like, No, there’s no problem. Like, I think maybe this person was you’re afraid of conflict or something, which I get, obviously.

Nicole:

Yeah, but you’re obviously not like, I’m not like that either. I’m like, let’s just talk about it. So yeah, obviously, there’s a vibe. So let’s clear it up. You know?

Kenzie:

I feel like I could just never get to like, what it was like, sure this person just like wouldn’t say anything. And I look back now and I think the environment that were in, there’s a lot of people who are just like, not very happy anyways.

Nicole:

And there’s nothing you can do about that, you know what I mean? But it’s so good, you’re able to identify it. It’s funny, because, you know, coming in, I was talking to my boyfriend about, you know, you know, having her on the podcast. And I was like, she’s younger than me. But she’s so smart. She’s doing so much. One of the things he said he was like, you know, you can learn from anyone I was like, That’s so true. And I think one of the big takeaways that I’m getting from this because I’m in LA. I just moved here two years ago, which you know, I have my friend group, but you always need local friends. You know what I mean? Like, there’s just no getting around it.

You need to have people who like and grab brunch and just like talk to yourself, and I’m making friends. But you know, listening to your intuition is always so important. And it sounds like you you really felt that you were like this is not adding up. Have you always been a person who it’s because that’s like one of my goals this year. I was talking to my team about it. I was like, look like two things, we’re not going to do one, we’re not going to kill ourselves behind this job, right? So the workaholic piece, some stuff that’s not going to get done is just gonna have to wait till tomorrow. Or if we can’t do it, we’re letting it go. And like we’re just gonna have to trust that it’s the God that is going to come back, if it’s important. We’re just not going to stress yourself out.

And then the second part is, if it doesn’t feel right, we’re not doing it. Like I don’t I can’t always explain why it doesn’t, you know, but that’s part of I think what makes people like us different is that we’re really good at being like, well, I want to try this thing and I’m gonna give it a shot.

Have you always been like that? Just kind of this seems like a good move. This seems like good content, or this friends gotta go or this guy isn’t right. Like, have you always or do you develop that like?

Kenzie:

Workwise? I’ve always been like that. Okay. relationally No. Oh, wow. And I think more so in friendships it was when I have the best friends. I’ve the friendships I’ve wanted for so long now.

Nicole:

Oh, that’s really amazing.

Kenzie:

So when I was in Texas, and a lot of them I did grow up with them, but like getting closer again.

Nicole:

And going through stuff like as an adult, it’s a big like nurturer.

Kenzie:

Yes. And I remember realizing, like being realizing how happy I was and there’s so much of it has to do with the like, keep like, codependent thing. No, not at all, but just like having the right people around.

Nicole:

You have friends around you that absolutely call you out. Oh, yeah. Tell you Oh my god. Yes. Good friend. Hey, this is not okay.

Kenzie:

Yeah. And the friendship just felt very freeing. And like, I could do anything, and I could just tell them anything. And there weren’t problems all the time. And that was when I started to realize looking back at how many of a lot of my friendships just like, especially in the world we were in things, are so complex, like it was everything was so complicated. Like yeah, such a big deal and it didn’t matter. And so I think as I got older, I started to look back and be like, that’s not what a good friend is. And that’s not a good friendship on my end as well. So it was more so a thing I developed as far as relationally but work wise I think it’s more natural.

Nicole:

Yeah, that’s so interesting. Yeah, we for me work it was never an issue and actually I’ve always felt kind of like crazy because this is the point of therapy but like gosh, like work it’s so easy to like make the call go for it just get it done, you know, but like relationship wise I’m like well maybe they didn’t mean that it shouldn’t be like this or maybe I’m just being too tough but when we don’t give him the business hat I should be giving him the friend had like that sort of energy so oh my gosh, like so good because it’s really just affirming like this conversation confirmed a lot of things I was already thinking now, in terms of what’s next for you so you are you have like product sponsorships that you do I think you have a couple of products of your own right?

Kenzie:

You so I started my own brand recently and that we started as clothing we’re gonna lean more into accessories because that’s what we love. And that’s what’s working Hey, um, so yes, I do have a brand.

Nicole:

Yeah. Tell me about it, you have a bag you carry right?

Kenzie:

One of my really good friends from college Jessica we intern together and so we and we were always the ones who were put together because she’s good at what I’m not gonna I’m gonna what she’s not good at so good. So we always talked about like doing something together and I’m not. I wouldn’t really work with any other friend, ever.

Nicole:

So I mean, listen, everyone, so many people get partners to do business ventures because they’re scared to do it by themselves and not because that person actually brings a skill set that you don’t have. So I love hearing that. That’s like your approach to it, because that’s how it actually works.

Kenzie:

Yeah. And she’s very administrative and detail oriented. And I’m big picture. I have all the relationships. So we had been talking about it, and then it just kind of ended up finally happening. And we launched in April of 2022.

Nicole:

Where are we right now? And and so what do you have? Like I know you said it was accessories you guys are doing bags for awhile. Tell me more about like the range so we can all check it out. Obviously, I’m gonna get stuff.

Kenzie:

So we have cellulite poplin sets. We have scarves and beanies, which is you know, it’s getting smarter. Yeah. And then the puff bag is definitely like our most like, most popular and we have a lot of other like bag accessory things that are coming out.

Nicole:

I just love it. I love it. And so between that I also know that you go on tour sometimes right like with a podcast and just like people having opportunities to see you. Is that coming up? Is anything coming up soon?

Kenzie:

Yeah, I have a Chicago and Nashville show soon. Both of those. I know I love the most like I love having a brand but like I am a host.

Nicole:

Yeah. You’re a people person, love to engage.

Kenzie:

Yes, I love hosting like I would love to do I love country music. So I’d love to be like more hosting in the country world. So I do love doing live shows. That’s like my favorite thing out of anything career related that I’ve done. So we are doing more, I want to do one in LA too, like I just I want to do one anywhere.

Nicole:

It’s so funny because I think one of the things I’m hoping people hear is that you found kind of what you want to do and how you want to show up. But so much of it has been driven by you being willing to do what you would do for free but not doing it for free. Yeah, because that’s how it ends up being a business. But really, and truly you’re like, No, I love to host so I did it. I started creating the content that I wanted to create. And people tapped into it, like I answer questions, but it’s based on what I really genuinely want to answer, not based on what I think I should do. And that’s just so powerful. Like it’s so exciting because, you know, as an adoptive mom and I have a 24 year old and a 21 year old. Like, I just hope that they hear this and see this they listen to my podcast, and sometimes they’re like, we don’t want to hear your voice.

Kenzie:

That’s actually huge that they listen to Oh my God.

Nicole:

Because usually they’re like, We know you we can call you like why do you want to hear you in our background? But you know, I’m gonna make them listen to this one for sure. Because like I’ve been telling them like you don’t understand like Kenzie Elizabeth is out here. And she’s doing incredible things. So I’m just so grateful you took the time out to like, chat with me today. And then like hopefully everyone who hears all the overlaps, you know in our life and just follows you and listens and supports because you just have so much to offer. And clearly it’s just the beginning.

Kenzie:

Thank you. I loved coming on. It was so fun.

Nicole:

Oh, thanks for being here. You’re amazing.

 
In this episode, Kenzie and I chat about:
  • Relationships and hustle culture,
  • If the hustle is worth it,
  • The development of Kenzie’s podcast and brand over the last few years, and
  • What she has learned along the way
Resources and links mentioned in this episode:
  • Find Kenzie’s apparel and accessory collection HERE
  • Listen to Kenzie’s podcast, ILYSM, HERE
  • Send me a DM on Facebook or Instagram
  • Record a voice message for me here
  • Listen to our last chat with wellness strategist, Lauren Chante, HERE!
  • I love reading your reviews of the show! You can share your thoughts on Apple here!
 
More about The Nicole Walters Podcast:

If you’re looking for the strategies and encouragement to pursue a life of purpose, this is the podcast for you! Week after week Nicole Walters will have you laughing hysterically while frantically taking notes as she shares her own personal stories and answers your DMs about life, business, and everything in between.

As a self-made multimillionaire and founder of the digital education firm, Inherit Learning Company, Nicole Walters is the “tell-it-like-it-is” best friend that you can’t wait to hang out with next.

When Nicole shows up, she shows OUT, so tune in each week for a laugh, a best friend chat, plus the strategies and encouragement you need to confidently live a life of purpose.

Follow Nicole on IG @NicoleWalters and visit inheritlearningcompany.com today and click the button to join our betterment community. Your membership gives you access to a world of people and tools focused on helping you build the life you want.